Motorbike, motorbikechick, motorbikelife, motorbikes, rider, suzuki motorbikes

Krazy Horse Cafe, Bury St Edmunds.

Hello,

I can see that I haven’t done a blog since November! Tragic or what…. Life has seemed to have got in the way a little, including my bike 😦 this will make sense in my next blog!

Anyway late last year, Adam and I decided to go for a Christmas eve ride and grab some lunch. The weather was half decent so we thought why the hell not.. We went to our favourite bikers cafe in Bury St Edmunds ‘KRAZY HORSE’.

Check them outhttps://krazyhorse.co.uk/pages/cafe

*Cafe Restaurant

*Motorbike and Car Services

*Parts & Accessories

*Clothes Department

*Events – BBQ nights with music and bands

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Mmmmmm food! I had a bacon and brie baguette – which by the way is to die for 😛 Adam went for the full english breakfast, what a winner! As you can see from the pics, the car park wasn’t very full – perfect moment for a few bike selfies!!! 😀

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After stuffing our faces with food it was time to hit the road, I was not keen to ride with a belly full of bacon but I had no choice, poor me! We headed off to a local supermarket and brought the most random item, American coleslaw.  The thing I love most about going to a supermarket on a bike, is that you can pretty much park anywhere you like I no one would dare question you otherwise. Know what I mean? Anyway with the coleslaw purchase done, time to pack it up and leave, fortunately I just managed to squeeze it into my tank bag, praying that it wouldn’t leak. I use a OXFORD bag, I’ll write a review about it another time but if you are wondering the bag done its job!

Up next…

The worse ride of 2017 😦

Lady Bee Biker xx

Ride safe ♥

 

 

helmet, Motorbike, motorbikechick, motorbikelife, motorbikes, rider, suzuki motorbikes

Choosing a lid

Choosing a lid/helmet is the most important part of your gear but can be the most fun. I say that but I ended up trying about 15 helmets on before I settled with my Bell RS-1 Desert Camo. I replaced the clear visor that came with it and added a bit of sexiness with a dark smoke visor . It was worth the purchase as it adds to the ‘racing’ look and keeps the sun out of my eyes as the helmet did not come with a internal visor – as most models do now.

 

bell_rs-1_topo_desert-camo

Buying a full face helmet will offer more protection but even the safest helmet will fail you in a crash if it’s too loose and comes off. According to EU research this happens in 12% of accidents 😦 For this reason, it is very important that the helmet fits correctly otherwise it will move around and cause discomfort especially in your neck. It needs to be snug so the padding does not move against your skin and make sure the helmet doesn’t cause any pain/tension on your head.

When you try a helmet in a shop you should keep it on for long as you can, I think I left mine on for a good 20 minutes. I felt like a idiot but I didn’t want to purchase something that was uncomfortable or not safe. Removable liners are another nice feature to look out for, as these can get pretty dirty especially if you ride everyday. Being able to put it in the washing machine could make bike life more enjoyable.

With our fantastic weather in the UK (haha) visors can steam up so check to see if yours comes with a anti-fog pinlock feature. If it doesn’t you can purchase one just for few golden nuggets and most shops will fit them to a visor for you! I would also consider ventilation features, as in hot weather you need good airflow to keep cool but need to close it off when weather turns nasty.

Read reviews if you can to see how other people feel about the product and look at wind noise levels. It took serval rides before I could feel the padding in my helmet adjust to my head shape and size. Lastly, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE check that the helmet passes either British or EU safety standards.Look at the SHARP website to see which standards are met and the results of a independent crash test, those with a higher star rating are safer.

People can get caught out at bike festivals with fake helmets and I would always purchase one at a proper shop – never buy online unless you have tried on before hand! Happy lid buying everyone 🙂

What lid do you guys wear?

 

Motorbike, motorbikechick, suzuki motorbikes

Finding the bike that’s right for you

It has finally happened… I am a proud owner of a Suzuki SV650s! 🙂

After passing my test I was very excited at the prospect of owning my own bike, who wouldn’t!? Adam has now owned his Kawasaki for about 3 weeks and don’t get me wrong, very happy for him but my goodness being pillion with him is not the same as riding solo!

At the start I didn’t know what sort of bike I wanted but was looking to get something similar to what I learnt on (Yamaha XJ6). The only reason being was the riding position and the comfort factor. However, throughout my search I knew a sporty looking bike would be the one (they look so fit!). With my low budget and A2 license, I was already limiting what sort of bike I could have and I soon realised I needed to sit on a few. Hmmmm this could take some time.

Bringing my new baby home
Kawasaki Z750r Suzuki SV650s

Nevertheless, eBAY and Gumtree do provide you with a good range to choose from 🙂 MCN bikes for sale is also decent but expect more dealership bikes than private.

For anyone on a A2 I would recommend doing your research on a range of bikes and try not to go for anything lower than 600cc. I say this because I’ve heard of people getting bored of a lower cc bike after just few months of owning, especially if they learnt on a bigger bike…. Also, if you decide to do your full license you can at least have a good size bike to ride when restrictor is removed. Win win I say 🙂

If you decide to buy down the private route (like I did) make sure you ask as many questions about the bike as you can. For example, has the bike had regular services, does it have good MOT records, what is it used for, where is it kept etc all these sorts of questions will build a picture of the owner and what sort of life the bike has had. Basic things to look out for on the bike itself would be bodywork, engine, brakes, chain, sprocket, tyres and look for leaks. Sit on the bike to test the suspension and make sure you take it for a good test ride. Nothing worse than getting what you thought was your dream bike and soon realising its not for you.

Let’s face it, most people who own motorbikes are good people and will look after it but you can never be too careful. Another good thing do to would be put the reg into government website to bring up MOT’s and while you’re at it, see how much the insurance will cost for the particular bike you are interested in. Finally, I will point out that many people will require full asking price and proof of insurance before you test ride, so be prepared. It is a sensible thing to do but I fear that it can limit your potential customer base when coming to sell, I guess it depends on the individual.